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Thunder Dragon Half Marathon in Bhutan: A recap by Max Tuck

Finish line Thunder Dragon

This post was written by Max Tuck, author of The Fatigue Solution: my astonishing journey from medical write-off to mountains and marathons, published by Hammersmith Health Books. 

“It’s all perfectly runnable.”… or so I was told in the pre-race briefing. And I’m sure it would have been – right up until the time that the Indian tectonic plate smashed into the Eurasian plate 50 million years ago and created the Himalayas.

I consider myself to be a reasonable runner, and I’d put in a hard winter of training in the lead-up to this race, the Thunder Dragon in Bhutan. A week earlier I was competing in a half marathon on the Great Wall of China – 5126 steps into history, and I felt every one of them. I somehow came second in my age category, despite it taking me nearly an hour longer than pretty much every other half marathon I have run, with the 30 degree temperature sapping my energy like you could only imagine.

But the Thunder Dragon – this was something entirely different. At 11 miles, my pace had slowed to a crawl. Perfectly runnable? It might have been for the organiser, a former London Marathon winner in a time of 2 hours 9 minutes. But for me, a recreational runner who 28 years ago had been deemed incurable by the medical profession – this wasn’t running, it was survival. I was at 2500 metres, feeling sick, dizzy and gasping for breath. I poured water over my head so that my mouth could focus solely on the act of breathing. It didn’t help.

My pace slowed to a walk. I faced a long uphill on a stony track at 8200 feet. Hard enough at lower altitudes, the sharp stones particularly cruel for a barefoot runner like me, whose only acclimatisation had been a hike to the famous Tiger’s Nest monastery at 3600 metres two days previously.

Yet somehow I finished, even managing to run the last mile (mainly, I’m sure, because it was downhill). It was the hardest half marathon I had ever done, reflected in my very slow time.

A major surprise came later that day at the prize-giving ceremony. An American runner was announced as the winner of the over 40 age category. “That can’t be right, Max,” she said as she went up to collect her prize. “You were about half an hour ahead of me!”

I smiled and congratulated her. Immediately afterwards, I was announced as the winner of the over 50s age group. We were both amazed – I because I had won my age category in that savage race, and she because she thought I was about 42, not 55. This anti-ageing lifestyle certainly has its benefits!

Max Tuck was in China and Bhutan raising money for Dogs Trust.

See www.justgiving.com/fundraising/maxagainstthewall to donate.

Max’s latest book The Fatigue Solution: my astonishing journey from medical write-off to mountains and marathons, is published by Hammersmith Health Books.

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The Fatigue Solution: From Medical Write-Off to Mountains and Marathons

The Fatigue Solution by Max Tuck

I used to like filling in forms. What could be more satisfying than taking a blank document and experiencing the joy of completing it to someone else’s exacting standards? Does this make me odd? Maybe you’re just not with me on this one. And today, I’ll confess, I’m not feeling the love either. There are so many other things I’d rather be doing on a Saturday afternoon.

The form in question is a visa application to enter the People’s Republic of China. If someone had told me 28 years ago that in May 2018 I would be embarking on my biggest running challenge in years, involving a half marathon on the Great Wall of China, followed by a race of the same distance at altitude in Bhutan in the Himalayas, I would have replied that they were clearly wrong, because I wasn’t expected to live that long. Never mind not only still being alive, but to be taking on that kind of physical challenge? Definitely a case of mistaken identity.

The reason for my disbelief would be simple. In 1990 my body was wasted and exhausted. As a vet, if I’d had a patient with as few white blood cells as I had, I would be looking down a microscope at a blood film to check, because the machine must have got it wrong. My desperately low white blood cell count was mirrored by my startlingly low bodyweight and complete muscle wastage. I was so weak that even getting into my car to drive to work involved significant effort. As for the idea of running races for charity in challenging conditions – forget it.

But here I am. In my book The Fatigue Solution, I explain how I went from medical write-off to mountains and marathons; how I rejected exhaustion and rediscovered life. It sounds like a dramatic turnaround. It certainly was.

What had happened to me? I was overworking myself, never taking breaks, cramming far too much in, never saying no, refusing to give up… and ultimately I lost my most precious possession. No, not my house, my job or my car – my health. You never fully appreciate what you have until you lose it. And at the ripe old age of 27, I lost that completely. It disappeared in a fog of exhaustion, muscle degeneration and viral attack. Hello Epstein-Barr virus and chronic fatigue. Goodbye life.

Or… so the doctors believed, based upon other patients similarly affected. Not me. I’m tough. I’m stubborn. I take huge delight in proving people wrong. As you’ll read in The Fatigue Solution, I never give up. Tell me I’m incurable? I’ll show you. Don’t tell me I can’t.

And prove them wrong I did. Not only am I still alive at the age of 55, I’m thriving. I’m fitter, stronger and have more energy than most 25 year olds (or so my personal trainer tells me anyway). My muscles all came back, and then some. Drastic turnaround? You bet. Was it easy? No. Did it take hard work, dedication and determination? Of course it did. Was it worth it? Hell yes!

The Fatigue Solution by Max Tuck

How, you might wonder, did I do it? After all, if you’re in a similar exhausted situation, running to the next lamp-post might seem impossible. Step by step, that’s how. As I explain throughout The Fatigue Solution, by upgrading every aspect of my lifestyle. By researching and implementing all the factors that are known to make a difference. Applying the information and using it to fuel my recovery, consistently, every day. By believing that I could, and that I was worth it. I did it for me. Armed with the right knowledge and a will to succeed, you can do it too.

There’s now only one thing standing between me and my tough far-eastern running challenge – that wretched visa application form.

Max Tuck’s book The Fatigue Solution: my astonishing journey from medical write-off to mountains and marathons is available in print and e-pub versions from Hammersmith Health Books.

For more information visit www.thefatiguesolution.co.uk

To support Max in her charity fundraising, visit www.maxagainstthewall.com

 

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CFS/ME: Are you sleeping too much?

CFS/ME: Are you sleeping too much

Difficulty with sleep is common for people with CFS/ME. Some people find they are sleeping too much, while others find they are not sleeping enough. If you experience problems with sleep there are several things you can do to help yourself.

There is no such thing as an ideal amount of sleep. For example, some people need 10 hours, while others only need five. An average night’s sleep is around eight hours. When the amount of sleep someone is getting is causing an increase in fatigue that is when it becomes a problem.

When people first have CFS/ME they often over sleep. People who have had CFS/ME for a longer period of time often go from over sleeping to not being able to sleep enough, despite high fatigue levels. Continue reading CFS/ME: Are you sleeping too much?

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Books on Prescription: Reading Well for Long Term Conditions

We are delighted to announce that Fighting Fatigue and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Navigating Your Way to Recovery have been placed on the Reading Well scheme for long term conditions.

If the pen is mightier than the sword, perhaps the book is mightier than the drug.

These stirring words from Professor Martin Marshall at the 2017 Reading Well launch really summed up the miraculous effect that books have on us.

Bibliotherapy –  the use of books and reading to facilitate management of and recovery from illness – is not a new concept, but it has found increased recognition in recent years thanks in part to the Reading Well scheme. Continue reading Books on Prescription: Reading Well for Long Term Conditions

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Invisible Illness: recognising the symptoms of Pernicious Anaemia

Invisible Illness: recognising the symptoms of Pernicious Anaemia

Pernicious Anaemia (PA) is an invisible illness caused by deficiency in vitamin B12 owing to problems absorbing it from food.

Everyone is different and sufferers of pernicious anaemia will experience the symptoms of the condition to varying degrees. Some patients will have all of the symptoms listed below while others will recognise only a few. This list has been compiled over a number of years and shows what a wide range of symptoms there can be. There are two problems with this wide range. First, many of the symptoms listed below are associated with other medical conditions, which often leads to confusion with other invisible illness and misdiagnosis. Secondly, because there are so many symptoms associated with pernicious anaemia, it makes it difficult for doctors to identify the symptoms specific to the disease – thus making an early diagnosis even less certain.

Common general symptoms of Pernicious Anaemia

  • Shortness of breath – ‘the sighs’
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Brain fog
  • Poor concentration
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Confusion (‘handbag in the fridge syndrome’)
  • Nominal aphasia (forgetting the names of objects)
  • Unaccountable and sudden bouts of diarrhoea, often following a spell of constipation
  • Clumsiness/lack of coordination
  • Brittle, flaky nails; dry skin anywhere on body
  • Mood swings, ‘tear jags’, heightened emotions
  • Sleep disturbance
  • Even though patient is exhausted, is unable to sleep
  • Waking up still tired, even after many hours’ sleep

Neurological symptoms of Pernicious Anaemia

  • Balance problems
  • Dizzy/faint
  • ‘Shoulder bumps’ – frequently bumping into or falling against walls
  • General unsteadiness, especially when showering and dressing
  • Inability to stand up with eyes closed or in the dark
  • Vertigo – inability to cope with heights, linked to the need for a visual reference as compensation for damage to the brain’s balance mechanism
  • Numbness/tingling – especially in hands, arms, legs, feet
  • Burning sensation in legs and feet – Grierson-Gopalan syndrome
  • Tinnitus – ringing/screeching/howling in the ear or ear
  • Neuropathic pain/fibromyalgia – often on only one side of the body
  • Irritability/frustration/impatience; desire for isolation, quiet and peace; aversion to bright lights and crowded spaces

Skin problems associated with Pernicious Anaemia

  • Hair loss – can range from moderate to sever; premature greying of hair
  • Psoriasis/eczema/acne
  • Rosacea – reddening of the skin around the nose and cheeks
  • Vitiligo – white patches that develop on the skin

Other medical problems associated with Pernicious Anaemia

  • Poor digestion
  • Arrhythmia – irregular, fast or slow heartbeat

Autoimmune conditions associated with Pernicious Anaemia

  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Hypo- or hyper-thyroidism – almost exclusively among females
  • Coeliac disease – sensitivity to wheat and/or wheat products
  • Myasthenia gravis – weak muscles leading to problems swallowing, chewing and opening eye(s)
  • Psoriatic arthritis

Vitamin B12 deficiency can be detected with a blood test, and if this deficiency is then determined not to be caused by diet it may be a clue that Pernicious Anaemia is the underlying invisible illness.

To learn more about Pernicious Anaemia diagnosis and treatment read What you need to know about Pernicious Anaemia and Vitamin B12 Deficiency by Martyn Hooper, founder of The Pernicious Anaemia Society.

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CFS/ME – Vicious circles and multitasking

As co-admin of Dr Myhill’s Facebook groups, I often see members asking what the single most important intervention in a person’s recovery from CFS/ME has been. I totally understand the reasoning behind this question – having limited funds where should attention be directed first to achieve the best results? Where does one find the most bang for one’s buck!

Dr Myhill instinctively takes this approach too, preferring her patients to do the ‘easy’ cheaper things first because these interventions are often enough on their own to elicit recovery. So, correcting sleep, doing the right diet and taking nutritional supplements are right at the top of the list. This is laid out in her CFS/ME checklist.

However, for some this is not enough and it is then that we must face the complexity of our intricate biological system with its many feedback loops and synergistic effects.

I am a mathematician and so the assumption is that I like linear arguments progressing from one irrefutable logic step to another, and so on, until we arrive at the ‘answer’! In my case, nothing could be further from the truth. For example, when first introduced to James Watt’s centrifugal governor, I was fascinated. This governor is essentially a continuous feedback system that controls the rate of a steam engine so as to maintain a near-constant speed, irrespective of the load or fuel-supply conditions. The constant speed of the engine achieved in this way is the mechanical equivalent of a well-functioning biological system. I enjoyed learning about these feedback systems but never had a chance to study the many biological examples because aged 12, I chose Latin and Ancient Greek over Biology for my school options.

However, life, and more specifically CFS, has forced me to become more acquainted with these biological systems because I am one of those for whom the ‘easy’ cheaper things have not fully worked.

As laid out in much more detail in Dr Myhill’s upcoming and fully revised book, Diagnosing and Treating CFS/ME – It’s mitochondria, not hypochondria and in Sustainable Medicine, there are many vicious circles in CFS/ME and these make the recovery process so much harder.

For example, if mitochondria go slow then the heart, being a muscle and so dependent on good mitochondrial function, will also go slow. The heart delivers fuel and oxygen to all cells in the body and so, if fuel and oxygen delivery is impaired then this too further impairs mitochondrial function. This can be seen below:

cfs-myhill-mitonchondria-vicious-circle

As further illustration, magnesium is of central importance for mitochondria. Having low levels of magnesium inside cells and mitochondria is a symptom of CFS but also a cause of it. This is because 40 per cent of resting energy simply powers the ion pumps for sodium/ potassium (Na/K) and calcium/magnesium (Ca/Mg) across cell membranes. When energy supply is diminished, as in mitochondrial dysfunction, there is insufficient energy to fire these pumps, and so magnesium cannot be drawn into the cells for oxidative phosphorylation to work. If there is insufficient energy to drag magnesium into cells, then there is a further diminishing of energy delivery, because of the lack of magnesium, and hence we have another vicious circle.

But all is not lost! We have at least two things in our favour – we now understand these vicious circles, and so can ‘break’ them, and many of the nutritional interventions we use can ‘multi-task’.

So, considering the two examples above, we can ‘break’ those vicious circles and so restore mitochondrial function by using Dr Myhill’s standard mitochondrial package of supplements, and by supplementing with magnesium we can further support the ion pump:

  • Coenzyme Q10 as ubiquinol – 200 milligrams
  • Vitamin B3 as niacinamide – 500-1500 milligrams – slow release
  • Acetyl-L-carnitine – 1-2 grams
  • D-ribose – up to15 grams
  • Vitamin B12 – 5 milligrams sublingually or ideally B12 by injection
  • Magnesium – ½ ml 50% magnesium sulphate, ideally, or 300mg orally

So, what of this multi-tasking then? Many interventions multi-task. High-dose vitamin B12 may be used to improve mitochondrial function, for detoxing via the methylation cycle, as an antioxidant and for its anti-inflammatory properties by damping down the pro-inflammatory fire of the NO/ON/OO cycle. This makes correcting multiple co-existent problems that much ‘easier’!

And then we have a ‘lovely’ example which I came to learn through both my own experience and also very many questions on Dr Myhill’s Facebook groups, essentially asking the same thing:

Why is it that when I have a sudden energy dip, I also feel weepy and emotionally fragile, weepy beyond what I would expect to feel?

Well, here is one way of looking at it – ATP is not only the energy molecule but also a neurotransmitter – to be precise, a co-transmitter. Other neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine, GABA and acetylcholine, will not work unless they are accompanied by a molecule of ATP. So, if ATP levels fall precipitously low, then one feels dreadfully fatigued [ATP as the energy molecule] and simultaneously one feels very low emotionally [ATP as co-transmitter]. To mitigate this ‘double whammy’ effect, I carry a bottle of water with D-Ribose dissolved in it and this works as a great ‘rescue remedy’ for when I experience these sudden ATP dips.

So, I suppose what I am saying is that CFS/ME sufferers should try the ‘easy’ things first but that if these don’t work out for you, then don’t despair. We know the circles that must be broken and we have some great helpers, like Vitamin B12 and D-Ribose, which can multi-task and solve more than one problem at once! Never ever give up!

Craig Robinson first met Sarah in 2001, as a patient for the treatment of his CFS, and since then they have developed a professional working relationship, where he helps with the maintenance of www.drmyhill.co.uk, the moderating of Dr Myhill’s Facebook groups and other ad hoc projects, as well as with the editing and writing of her books.

A fully revised and expanded 2nd Edition of Dr Myhill’s book Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: it’s mitochondria, not hypochondria will be published in January 2017.

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Sustainable Medicine in The People’s Book Prize

Dr Sarah Myhill’s latest book, Sustainable Medicine, has reached the final of The People’s Book Prize Autumn 2015, in the non-fiction category.

The People’s Book Prize was set up to create an award for the books that readers loved as an alternative to the traditional book prizes awarded by panels of judges. The People’s Book Prize offers a level playing field for new and undiscovered authors, and it is the only award based entirely on a public vote.

We are very proud that Sustainable Medicine has been nominated in the non-fiction category, up against some stiff competition. Based on the essential premise that contemporary Western medicine is failing to address the root causes of disease processes, Dr Myhill’s book aims to empower readers to heal themselves through addressing the underlying reasons for ill health.

Sustainable Medicine author Dr Sarah Myhill

We believe in sharing information that empowers people to help themselves, and Sustainable Medicine is one of the most important and potentially game-changing books we’ve published. There is a crisis in modern medicine and we need to move forward with a sustainable and person-centred approach that maximises health without recourse to pharmaceuticals.

By voting for Sustainable Medicine in The People’s Book Prize you can help spread the word and lift the lid on some of the areas where change is most needed. Dr Myhill has already helped thousands of people struggling with chronic fatigue and other conditions so let’s get her latest book the recognition it deserves!

Click here to vote for Sustainable Medicine in The People’s Book Prize.

More about the author:

Dr Sarah Myhill qualified in medicine (with Honours) from Middlesex Hospital Medical School in 1981 and has since focused tirelessly on identifying and treating the underlying causes of health problems, especially the ‘diseases of civilisation’ with which we are beset in the West. She has worked in NHS and private practice and for 17 years was the Hon Secretary of the British Society for Ecological Medicine (renamed from the British Society for Allergy, Environmental and Nutritional Medicine), a medical society interested in looking at causes of disease and treating through diet, vitamins and minerals and through avoiding toxic stress. She helps to run and lectures at the Society’s training courses and also lectures regularly on organophosphate poisoning, the problems of silicone, and chronic fatigue syndrome. She has made many appearances on TV and radio. Visit her website at www.drmyhill.co.uk.

Sustainable Medicine is available as paperback and ebook from £4.50

Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is available in paperback and ebook from £4.50

Click here to vote for Sustainable Medicine in The People’s Book Prize.

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Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome at the BMA Medical Book Awards

We’re very proud to announce that Dr Sarah Myhill’s book Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome was highly commended in the Popular Medicine category at the BMA Medical Book Awards 2015. The book has quickly become one of our best sellers and is helping Sarah’s groundbreaking chronic fatigue syndrome protocol reach thousands of people around the world who wouldn’t otherwise have the chance to learn the tests and treatment methods she’s worked so hard to develop. It was up against some pretty stiff competition in its category so it’s a real achievement to have been highly commended.

Dr Myhill (middle right) with her team at the BMA Medical Book Awards for her book on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Dr Myhill (centre right) with her team at the BMA Medical Book Awards

Sharing expert knowledge about areas of medicine and health that aren’t so well represented by the mainstream is our goal at Hammersmith Health Books, and Dr Myhill’s book is a perfect example. In it Dr Myhill explains the importance of mitochondria and their role in every aspect of our lives, showing how we fail if they fail. She shows how their activity can be measured and how her recently published research supports her programme for mitochondrial recovery spelt out here as the basis for recovery from CFS/ME.

Congratulations to Sarah and her team who helped produce the book and support the many hundreds of chronic fatigue syndrome patients who visit her clinic and countless more who seek her advice and help remotely.

Dr Myhill's book Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome was highly commended at the BMA Book Awards 2015

If you’d like to learn more about Dr. Myhill’s work visit www.doctormyhill.co.uk or join the Facebook group to meet other CFS/ME patients and get inside info on the protocol.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is now on sale in paperback and ebook formats from £4.50

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Zone Diet goes Mediterranean

The Zone Diet: Eating for a longer, leaner, healthier life

The Mediterranean Zone represents the final part of Dr. Sears’ trilogy on anti-inflammation nutrition that started with his first book, The Zone, written in 1995. The Zone Diet is for anyone looking to take control of his or her life. It is germane to weight loss, managing chronic disease, or improving athletic performance. All three areas are ultimately controlled by the ability to reduce inflammation. The Mediterranean Zone provides the final part of his dietary roadmap to a longer and better life, as described by The Zone Diet.

The newest book on the Zone Diet: The Mediterranean Zone by Dr Barry SearsThe focus of The Mediterranean Zone is on the emerging role of polyphenols in both improving human health and slowing the aging process. Polyphenols are the chemicals that give fruits and vegetables their color. We now know that at higher levels they are critical for controlling gene expression, especially those genes involved in the synthesis of anti-oxidative enzymes, controlling inflammation, and activating anti-aging defense mechanisms as well as controlling the microbes in our gut.

Why is it more important to eat omega-3 fatty acids than omega-6?

Whereas omega-6 fatty acids are pro-inflammatory, omega-3 fatty acids are anti-inflammatory. However, you need a balance to maintain a stable inflammatory response. Ideally the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids in the diet should be about 2:1. Today in the developed world it is closer to 20:1. That’s why our diets have become more pro-inflammatory.

The reason that an individual stops any diet is because they are always hungry and tired. This is not the case following the dietary guidelines in The Mediterranean Zone, or in any Zone Diet. By stabilizing blood sugar, balancing hormonal levels, and reducing inflammation you are never tired or hungry between meals. The benefit of that freedom from hunger and fatigue is that you will also live a longer and better life.

Welcome to the Zone!

The Mediterranean Zone is available now or for more information on Dr Sears visit www.drsears.com.

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Sustainable Medicine: the path to a patient-centred future

I have worked with Sarah Myhill for over 15 years, both as a Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) patient and also academically. As such, I have witnessed the crystallisation of the ideas that led to the concept and writing of Sustainable Medicine from both sides of the fence. These ideas were applied to me personally and I also saw them develop in my role as editor of Sarah’s writings, and also of her website – http://www.drmyhill.co.uk/wiki/Main_Page

Sustainable Medicine: swinging the pendulum back in favour of the patient

Sustainable Medicine follows a logical path, with the ultimate goal of empowering readers to take charge of their own health. This empowerment will not only help to heal diseases already present in readers, but also, and equally crucially, will lay down a route map for the healthy to remain healthy. It is for everyone.

Sustainable Medicine by Dr Sarah Myhill
Sustainable Medicine by Dr Sarah Myhill

The starting point of this journey was the realisation that 21st Century Medicine is not working for the benefit of the patient. So much of modern medicine is driven by vested financial interests that the patient is almost completely forgotten in this process. The patient, the one who knows their body, and the one who is suffering from the symptoms and diseases, is often ignored or, at best, side-lined or even patronised, in the diagnosis and treatment of their disease. Worse than this, modern medicine is not “sustainable”, either for society or the patient, because the use of powerful symptom suppressing drugs often escalates the disease process, rather than reversing it.

Sustainable Medicine has the simply stated objective of swinging the pendulum back in favour of the patient and away from those vested interests.

Sarah Myhill is an inquisitive person. As a patient, you notice this the very first time you speak with her or meet her. She is not like other doctors; there is a genuine desire to know you, and your life, and where you have worked and lived, and so on. In short, Sarah wants to know the ‘whole’ you; she is not a “Symptom List” doctor, by which I mean a physician who asks for your symptoms and then “replies” with a prescription pad. Put crudely, by knowing you better, Sarah can treat you better, although this underplays her most endearing quality; she likes her patients and treats them as equals.

This innate inquisitiveness naturally led Sarah always to ask the question ‘why?’ and in the practice of medicine this question is translated into a quest to find the root causes of disease and symptoms.

This is where Sarah’s 30 years of clinical experience made its mark known and also where the “logical path” was laid down.

First, Sustainable Medicine discusses symptoms, not as something to be immediately squashed with powerful prescription drugs, but rather as signposts as to what may be going wrong. Symptoms are the early warning system of the body that all is not right.

The next step along this logical path is an exposition of what mechanisms may be causing these symptoms and how one can identify which particular mechanisms are at play in this patient. The identification of these mechanisms is achieved by tests and clinical signs and symptoms.

At this point along the logical path, the reader will have identified their symptoms and also isolated the mechanisms causing those symptoms. The next step is to lay out the “tools of the trade”, that is the interventions, that can be put in place to treat those mechanisms as identified. These interventions are “sustainable” in that they reverse, not escalate, disease processes.

The logical path is now complete:

Symptoms => Mechanisms of disease => Sustainable Treatments (“tools of the trade”) to treat and reverse these Mechanisms

By way of example, Sustainable Medicine then looks at very many individual diseases, identifies the underlying mechanisms of these diseases and then applies the “tools of the trade” required to reverse these disease processes. To further illustrate this logical path, Sarah concludes with some case studies of her own patients, ranging from diseases such as chronic lymphatic leukaemia to inflammatory arthritis to CFS.

Sustainable Medicine was launched at a Biocare Advanced Education Day on 13 July 2015, where Sarah detailed her views on the mechanisms and sustainable treatments as applied to CFS, as well as discussing the critical roles played by inflammation and immune system issues in many modern diseases.

Craig Robinson, Editor, Sustainable Medicine.

 

Read the first chapter of Sustainable Medicine for free here or order your copy. Want to tell us what you think of the book? Leave a review on Amazon, and if you have any questions you can contact Craig and other followers of Dr Myhill’s protocol for CFS in the Facebook group.